Meditation Benefits: Patience and the Practice of Meditation

Patience and the practice of meditation will equal consistency. And because every action has a reaction, it’s not possible to consistently practice and not receive benefits. However, those benefits may not be noticeable to you early on in your practice. This is where your patience comes in. You may not, in the beginning, notice the benefits, but gradually over time, because you are storing the samskaras (impressions) in your unconscious mind, the benefits will bloom to help you later. And because it takes time to notice the results be consistent, and most of all, gentle with yourself.

Meditation Benefits: Patience and the Practice of Meditation

Patience and the Practice of Meditation

Meditation is quietly looking inward, beyond the mind and discovering the different levels of your being, one after another. This process is personal and it is experiential, meaning that it can only grow out of practice and not by intellectual pursuits. This is important because you “need to do in order to be.”

In his article in the “times of India,” Sant Rajinder Singh notes that there are two ‘elements’ which make up the study and pursuit of spiritual (self-realization) teaching, Study and practice (he refers to study as theorizing). Singh warns against too much study and not enough practice.

As a way of illustrating the point he tells us a story of  Buddha and one of his disciples Malunkyaputta.

“While we must satisfy the mind and have our questions answered, we do not want to get trapped into mental wrangling, for that is like a spider web in which we may get stuck.

The Buddha spent 45 years teaching spiritual truths to enable people to break free of the karmic wheel of life that binds them to this world. Buddha was full of compassion and served humanity selflessly. The only time he did not tour was during the rainy season, when he stayed in one place. He gave all an equal chance to find the way to enlightenment.

So many questions

One day, a disciple, Malunkyaputta sought an interview with the Buddha. Malunkyaputta had a restless mind, that asked: “Is the world infinite or finite? Is the soul identical with the human body?” Since he was preoccupied with these questions, he could not meditate. He requested the Buddha to answer his questions failing which he would leave the order.

Buddha replied, “O Malunkyaputta, did I ever ask you to take up this path and did I promise you that I would answer these intellectual wranglings?” The disciple sheepishly replied, “No.” Buddha said, “Whoever worries about these meaningless speculations such as whether the world is infinite or finite, or whether the soul looks like the body, is taking away time from spiritual practice. It is just like someone who is shot by an arrow who instead of letting the doctor treat him to get out the poison starts saying, ‘I will not allow my wound to be treated until I know who is the man who shot me, what kind of person is he, is he tall or short, what type of bow and arrow did he use, or what colour is his skin.’ The key is to get treatment first. Similarly, if we say we will not do our spiritual practices until we get answers to these questions about whether the universe is eternal or not, and other such questions, then one may pass one’s whole life and never reach the spiritual goal.”

While in the Simsapa forest near Kosambi, Buddha was sitting with his disciples. He picked up a few leaves and asked his disciples, “What is your opinion? Which is more? Is it the few leaves in my hand, or the leaves in the forest around us?”

The disciples said, “You have very few leaves in your hand, while there are many more in the forest.” Buddha then told them, “It is the same with my teachings. Of everything I know, I have only told you a little. What I have not told you is much more, like the leaves in the forest. Why did I not tell you everything I know? The reason is that all that information is not useful. Information that will not lead to enlightenment, I have not told you. I have only told you that which you need to know to gain the spiritual experience and find salvation.”

Practise makes perfect

As we think about our own lives, many get involved in intellectual pursuits. But there comes a point when we find that the mind will never stop its wrangling. We have to discriminate which questions will help our spiritual progress and which ones are merely to satisfy the intellect’s curiosity. People who are steeped in the theoretical side of religion can spend years debating each point found in scriptural writings and never find any solution. It is far better to spend time in our spiritual practices so that we can rise above our limited intellect and come in contact with our soul. Then, we will not have to wonder about answers, for we will know them for certain and see them for ourselves. Our soul has all the answers; it is one with the Lord.” Read more…

In cultivating a meditation practice, how much and what technique you need to practice, will depend on your motivation. If you simply want a little less stress in your life, you don’t need to meditate three or four hours a day, on the other hand if you are seeking spiritual awakening, then ten minutes in the morning really isn’t going to cut it. This is where the “theorizing” come in, after determining your motivation you can begin to discover which meditation or combination of meditation practices fit your needs.    

No matter which technique(s) you decide upon, at first you will see progress in terms of feeling less stress, physically relaxed and emotionally calmer. As your practice progresses and depending, again on your intention, you may begin to notice subtle changes. At this stage some of the benefits of meditation will only make themselves known over time and are less dramatic.

With persistence, patience and the practice of meditation, you will discover a sense of freedom. Freedom from everyday worries and the freedom to experience the joy in this moment.

What is your motivation? What meditation techniques do you use, and do you need help determining what one fits your needs. You can share here.

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Meditation Benefits: Duck don’t do Anger

Meditation Benefits: Duck don’t do Anger

Meditation Benefits: Duck don’t do Anger

There’s a story told in meditation circles used to illustrate how meditation helps us deal with a very human emotion; anger. The story, I like to describe as, ‘ducks don’t do anger,’ tells how two ducks fighting over a piece of bread, after a short bit of angry nipping at each other, are able to just swim away, and unlike their human observers aren’t holding a grudge, feeling resentment or feeding their anger.

Anger is part of being human and it’s hardwired into our reptilian brain, it comes from our ego state, that part of us that needs us to feel secure and safe. In order to deal with anger we must find the underlying cause. Anger can rise out of fear, pain, sorrow; anger can be a cry for attention or help, it may be an expression of grief, loneliness or a desire for love.

In the end we have to own our anger and more importantly the root cause and in order to own it, we need to acknowledge it and not try and repress it. The questions arise, can meditation help us embrace this shadow side of our humanness and if so how?

Meditation is a practice of awareness and when we sit in meditation we start to become present with those parts of who we are, even those parts which we’ve repressed, hidden from, the darker side of our nature.

Unpleasant as unearthing these thoughts, feeling and emotions are, as long as we continue to repress them, the more they will rise up and make themselves known. Meditation opens a doorway allowing us to see what the real emotions are hiding behind it. Meditation invites us in to witness the anger, and in that process of witnessing anger, begin to evaporate it.

Ram Dass describes this process as ‘making friends with anger,’  a place from which he no longer identifies with it, he said it this way, in the Shapiro’s new book, “Be the Change,” “I still see anger arise, even after thirty years of meditating. But now, when it does, I can say, ‘Hello old friend’ and invite in for a cup of tea.”  He went on to say, “Meditation has helped to overcome the more negative places, like anger, because it gives me the chance to bring together my identification with my awareness.”

Anger unchecked can do untold damage both on an individual level and on the wider level of our collective consciousness. When anger is repressed it can transform into hatred, a transformation that occurs when we feel we’ve been especially wronged.

It’s natural to feel greater justification for this kind of anger, as well as, in situations where we see injustice. And in situations where find gross inhumanity, it becomes possible to transform angry passion into acts of compassion. This, however, can be a slippery slope, because justification can, also, become rational, and rational can be used to justify irrational acts.

It’s this level of anger that creates enemies and is ultimately the rational for violence. So, how do we move from anger and hatred of our enemies, to a place, if not of love, at least of tolerance?     

Deepak Chopra offers us this analysis of the problem from his blog post, “How to Love Your Enemies (Really).”  

Deepak Chopra

Deepak Chopra

1. Anger is a natural emotion, but when it turns to hatred, a natural emotion becomes distorted. Anger is bottled up and feeds on itself. Ideas of revenge, retribution and violence build up over time. People who have injured, opposed or offended you start to turn into enemies.

2. The rationale for hating an enemy can become quite complex and convincing. Long-held grudges always tell a story in which the wronged party is in the right. But behind these rationales the fuel is bottled-up anger.

3. Even when someone commits a horrendous offense against you, which would seem to justify seeking revenge, you are doing harm to yourself by harboring built-up anger. This insight, which is hard for many people — and nations — to arrive at, is key.

4. Once you see that the problem is built-up anger, and that anger is irrational and destructive, there is an incentive to release it. An emotional debt to the past creates suffering in the present. In cases where horrible crimes have been committed, the higher goal is to seek justice, not revenge. The two aren’t the same thing.

5. Paying old emotional debts can be done in various ways. A person can begin to cross the divide, talking to his enemy and realizing that both share a common psychology. Empathy can be cultivated. Letting go of pride and ego is worth pursuing. Yet much of this letting go happens only at the mental level, which isn’t adequate to the hot, violent feelings being held inside. In fact, when anger management training brings up old hostility without giving a way to release it, attempts at controlling anger fail miserably.

6. Releasing the hot, violent energy of anger can be done. Under the rubric of “energy work,” there are now many practitioners in this area. If that seems too arcane, it needn’t. Sit down and revisit a memory that arouses your anger. Generally these are memories where you feel that an injustice has been committed against you. Your mind is filled with reasons for how you were wronged. Now pause and feel the actual energy of your anger. Your body may be tense, your skin warm, breathing ragged, heartbeat increased. The physical side of anger is the key to releasing it, because rationales go on forever. They are all-consuming and self-consuming at the same time.

7. Once you have contacted the physical side of anger, there is a pivotal moment. If you express your anger by acting it out, mentally or physically, none of the energy will be released. Feeling your anger and expressing it still holds the energy inside. You must want the anger to go, which can be tricky. Like every strong emotion, anger believes in itself; it wants to stick around and keep telling you its story. To get past this allure, stop paying attention to the story and the rationales attached to it. Instead, focus on making the angry energy leave. This may require an experienced guide, because the pivotal moment is psychologically slippery. Read more…

In meditation, because we develop a greater sense of self-awareness, we have the opportunity to see anger as it is, with all its recurring patterns of thought and its waves of shadow energy, and make ‘friends with it.’ It is from this quiet space of self-reflection that we can begin to accept ourselves for who we are.   

Meditation is not a panacea; will we will be instantly be transformed into beings of light and love because we’ve practiced sitting on the cushion? No.   Meditation’s benefit is that it allows us to be honest and accepting of ourselves as we are and it’s that awareness which carries with it the power of real transformation.

A Benefit of Meditation is Survival in the 21st Century

 

The Benefits of Meditation in a Fast Paced World

The Benefits of Meditation in a Fast Paced World

Of the many benefits of meditation, you would think that survival in today’s world might be at or near the top of the list. And how, you may ask, can meditation help me survive in the 21st century? Because meditation is an antidote to stress, the kind of stress that comes as the result of isolation, loneliness, alienation and creates related illnesses and depression.

Meditation provides a way of transforming stress and anxiety into balance and ease. During meditation the body shifts into a state of restful awareness, which is a counterbalance to all the negative effects on the body-mind cause by chronic stress.

But in order to enjoy the benefits of meditation you will first need to carve out a few minutes a day, and it’s right at this point that you may discover your first “resistance” to meditation, in the form of thoughts, all of which are giving you good reasons not to meditate or why you just don’t have time to do it.

The real difference in getting past the resistance come in how you approach meditation to begin with. If you approach meditation as an obligation, something you need or should do, the chances are, you will meet with a great deal of push back, if on the other hand, your approach is one of curiosity and joy, you will get to taste the richness of the meditative experience and enjoy the commiserate benefits,

In the post I’m sharing with you here, the author informs us about “the benefits of meditation in a fast paced world” from his perspective. So here it is…

“In today’s world, very few of us have the time to stop and properly rest and relax. Most of us spend our time going from one activity to the other as if we’re nothing more than a busy bee in a giant hive. The problem with this lifestyle is that we’re all slowly wearing ourselves down to nothing. Our bodies need the rest that we deny them so often in order to properly recharge and heal. There are, however, quick forms of rest that can help to rejuvenate us and give us some much needed energy. One form of this is meditation.

Many people view meditation as only a spiritual and religious activity. While it is used by many religious and spiritual people, anybody else can gain the benefits of meditating. Meditation itself is only the act of using controlled breathing techniques to relax the body and clear the mind. Anything that would make meditation spiritual or religious is the individual, not the practice. In order to properly meditate, you need to be breathing properly. If you chest rises when you breath in, then you are breathing shallowly and improperly. If your abdomen rises when you are breathing, then you are filling your lungs completely and breathing properly.

Take a deep breath, inhale slowly and fill your lungs to capacity. When you lungs are full, hold the breath for a second, then exhale slowly. During meditation, you are focused on your breathing. Keep breathing like this until you feel relaxed. In order to focus yourself more on your breathing; inhale, hold, and exhale to a count. For example: Inhale for a count of 5, hold for a count of 2, exhale for a count of 5, hold for another count of 2 and repeat. If a count of 5 is not long enough to fill your lungs, make the count longer (but don’t hold the breath for longer than a count of 4). Keeping a count during deep breathing helps to focus you more on just that activity while clearing everything else out of your mind.

While you can use the breathing exercise at just about anytime in any place, it’s better to have a quiet place to relax in order to reap the full benefits of meditation. Any place that offers you at least a few minutes of privacy is ideal. Whether it be at home, in your car, in the break room at work or even in the bathroom, a few private minutes during the aforementioned breathing exercise will help you to relax. Sit, stand or lay in a comfortable position and initiate the breathing exercise. Relax with every inhale and let tension leave your body with every exhale. Even if you only have the time to do this for a minute, you should feel more relaxed and ready to face the challenge(s) that lie ahead of you.

One of the major upsides to meditation is that you can take as little or as much time as you want with it. Obviously the longer you meditate, the better you’ll feel, but you can still relax yourself even if you only have a minute or two. Another upside is that meditation can help you take your mind off of stress, or even pain (like getting a shot, piercing, tattoo, etc.) or can just help you to bring your mind to focus on a task that you deem to be important (like homework, housework, or a business project).

If you want to meditate to focus, just bring the task to the front of your mind after you use the breathing exercise to clear everything else out. Keep breathing and think about the task at hand. Tell yourself that you want to get the task done in a specific time frame, that you will keep your focus on the task and block out distractions until it is done. Keep this up until you feel ready, then get started with your task. This may be hard at first, but the longer you do it, the shorter the time it takes to keep your focus until you don’t even have to meditate to focus on a task.

Remember that you can meditate just about anywhere at any time and you can use the breathing exercises to simply relax yourself when you need to.”

Meditation is surrounded by paradox and developing a practice is one of them. Because, first of all, the ‘act’ of meditating is not an ‘act,’ it’s a state of being, and secondly, we tend to think of freedom as escape from routine and discipline, and yet, in meditation, it’s the creation of a regular practice that liberates us by creating space within as we discover our true nature.

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Entering the Ground State of Creation: A Meditation Benefit

Entering the Ground State of Creation: A Meditation Benefit

Entering the Ground State of Creation

As human beings dealing with everyday situations, relationships and events, we have grown accustom to living life within limitations and reacting to life based our socialized conditioning. There’s a meditation benefit that’s not discussed as often, as say, stress reduction, and yet this deeper benefit opens powerful new possibilities.

In meditation we slip into the space between thoughts, the field of non-local awareness and pure silence where we gain access to energy, creativity and new possibilities for personal growth and wellbeing.

While our physical experience in space-time, meaning they have a beginning and an end, and our thoughts, while they don’t exist in space, do exist in time. In meditation we step beyond space-time into the infinite, outside of space-time, and discover the real us, the one who is experiencing the space-time events.

Andrew Cohen, founder and Editor of “EnlightenNext” magazine, always expresses this experience so beautifully. So here’s Andrew Cohen from his, “Aol Healthy Living” blog post…

“When you go deeply into the meditative state, your awareness detaches itself from the thought-stream. Then your identification with emotion, memory, time and body begins to fall away. You become aware of something very mysterious. Imagine that you had been fast asleep in a small dark chamber and then you suddenly awakened to find yourself floating in the infinite depth of a vast, peaceful ocean. You literally become aware of a new dimension, when moments before you had experienced yourself as being trapped, a prisoner of your body, mind and emotions. When you awaken to this new dimension, all sense of confinement disappears. You feel that you have access to the whole universe and also to that which the universe exists within. You’re aware of body, mind, time, and space, but there’s another dimension that extends in all directions, unlimited by any of it. Meditation is the portal to this dimension, a door to the realization of limitlessness.

Why is this experience significant? Because the infinite context you awaken to is not just a quiet place inside your own head. It’s a deeper dimension of reality itself. Life, death and everything in between, reality as a whole — the seen and the unseen, the known and the unknown, all that ever was and ever could be — is made up of both the manifest and the unmanifest. But most of the time, all we are aware of is the manifest dimension, the domain of time and space and becoming. Meditation will give you the direct, conscious experience of the unmanifest dimension, which is the ground of being itself.

The “ground of being” is empty. It is an objectless, timeless, spaceless, thoughtless void. But everything that exists has come from this no-place, including you and me. Paradoxically, while empty, this no-place is pregnant with infinite, unborn potential. It is the ground we all emerge from, the womb of the entire universe. When something came from nothing, 14 billion years ago, the nothing didn’t disappear. That unmanifest, unborn dimension is the ever-present ground out of which everything is arising in every moment. And meditation allows you to know this ground within your own experience. Even in the awareness of the body and the movement of thought, beneath it all, in the state of meditation, you become conscious of a current of stillness that is the echo and the reflection of the ground of being. There is a great mystery there. In the infinite depth of that emptiness, there arises a knowing, a pure knowing itself that seems to answer all our questions and relieve us of all our existential doubts.

Whenever we journey far enough beyond the conditioned mind — beyond thought, beyond form, beyond time — we will always discover this same mystery. That is why we meditate, so we can awaken to the instantaneously liberating nature of the ground of being. The more profound is our experience of the ground of being, the more we begin to emanate that mysterious knowing which is enlightened consciousness itself.”

Through the meditation benefit of quieting the mind of all your inner turbulence, you begin to reflect your deeper connection to peace, joy and wellbeing in your actions, thoughts, words and deeds, into your everyday world, transcending your unconscious socialized conditioning, allowing your desires and intentions for happiness, health, peace and love to be fulfilled.Click here to visit the original source of this post

The Meditation Benefits May be Enough

There are numerous challenges that you encounter once you’ve decided to begin a regular meditation practice, and as it turns out the meditation benefits may be all the motivation and inspiration you’ll need to get past those challenges. ᅠᅠ

The benefits of meditation have gathered the attention of the scientific community long before Westerners started becoming adept at meditation and that trickle of scientific interest as grown to a flood in the last few years.

In this post the discussion surrounds this topic of motivation, meditation and benefits.

Meditation to most people is one of those things which sound nice, is interesting at first, but does not have enough pull to get one really excited. Using a particular meditation to help you relax for 10 minutes seems enough, there doesn’t seem to be any more to it. Some people try visualisations, or even give a Vipassana retreat a go, but on the whole, unless you are a diehard spiritual seeker who has had much pain and discontent in your life, meditation is one of those things that you look at, are curious about, but turn from getting too caught up in.

I think this is because the benefits of meditation have not been discussed enough – and when it is discussed it seems to be spoken of in terms of – freedom from illusion, or mind, liberation from the body or samsara, and as interesting as that is – it doesn’t really sell the idea, the terms are too abstract. Unless you are caught in a corner with nowhere else to go, unless you are withstanding some crisis, pain or disillusionment, you do not have what is necessary to persevere with it, til you can see why people indulge and recommend it.

People also I think can get caught up in the surrounding philosophy and related fields, such as the psychic domain and this leads people into the future rather than working with what is happening now. Meditation next to future possibilities seems a little backward, colourless, or mundane. So it becomes easy to see why so many gravitate to clairvoyance and related fields the whole time dabbling only minimally with meditation…

…If one is able to persevere through all this, and actually continue to meditate and reach beyond the thought dance, they then may encounter an experience they cannot explain with their mind which scares them, they for a moment lose contact with the world around them everything they know and love, and something else penetrates, and perhaps penetrates too deeply, thus scaring them away. Or they encounter some repressed emotion from a previous time, this overwhelms them, overcomes them, and easily waylays their interest in the field.


There are then many obstacles to meditation which could easily derail even the best of intentions – and at the end of the day, it is normally only when people are backed into a corner of pain or disillusionment that they feel and know the necessity of remaining with this technique.

When you can look at your thoughts and not feel compelled into action as a result, when you can see your sadness and anger but not fall into them and let them invade and influence you, you have significantly altered your life path for the better, right up until your death bed. No one can take this from you, they can try, they can isolate, persecute, condemn or try and manipulate you, but the link between you and their words are broken, just as you can see the futility of your own thoughts, so too can you see more penetratingly into theirs. Thus leaving you free to consider their actions, behaviours, or coercions without needing to give in and follow them, refute or rebel against them, for you see so clearly the weightlessness of their intent.

This certainly makes meditation worth looking at again…

If you are struggling to develop a regular meditation practice because you are looking for the motivation, to get started or to stay engaged, then ask yourself what issues, physical, mental or spiritual are creating challenges in your life and chances are you will discover a meditation benefit that will help you with your motivation. ᅠClick here to visit the original source of this post

Top Research Psychiatrist Promotes Meditation Benefits

This post is, essentially, an interview with Norman Rosenthal, M.D. professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School, who is best known for his study and treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Dr. Rosenthal as just published a book, “Transcendence: Healing and Transformation Through Transcendental Meditation,” which features case studies and interviews with meditators, including such celebrities as Paul McCartney, Russell Brand and many others.

At the end of the article there is a video presentation with Dr. Rosenthal and in it he starts off qualifying himself by saying, “…I’m not a TM insider” and noting that he came to the practice later in life. However, Dr. Rosenthal, quickly makes it known that he’s did his research and in the process discovered a large volume scientifically measurable data.

A world-renowned psychiatrist is speaking out about a powerful antidote, he believes, for many of our modern woes, a way to help overcome stress-related disorders while opening a new window to the potentialities of the human brain.

There have been a number of posts this week about Dr. Rosenthal speaking about Transcendental Meditation and his new book; this one by Jeanne Ball is by far the best. Dr.  Rosenthal is another scientific voice adding to the validity of the benefits of meditation.

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Is Learning how to Receive Support and Love a Meditation Benefit?

Becoming more self-aware is the number one benefit of meditation, because self-awareness creates the opportunity for self-acceptance. You need to know and accept who you are now, especially if you want to transform any aspect of your life. When we are more self-aware, it also means we have the opportunity to become less self-critical and allowing ourselves to open to receiving.

For me a guided meditation or centering technique is like a poetic journey that my mind agrees to take By simply choosing to

Because the Universe operates through a constant exchange of energy and information, with giving and receiving being the different aspects of the flow, creating homeostasis or balance is the key to peace and happiness. And the act of being able to graciously receive is as necessary as giving, especially when receiving life’s most precious gifts like love, appreciation, laughter, wisdom, support or joy.

Self-awareness creates discernment, allowing to dig deeper and distinguishing the root causes of feeling and emotions, which are often different than what they appeared to us to be on the surface.

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Meditation it’s not What You Think

The first time I heard this phrase, it was in a talk given by Jon Kabat – Zinn, Ph.D. where he mention that he had a tee shirt with the ‘it’s not what you think’ saying printed on it.

The reason this quote is popular among meditators is because it says it all and it’s said, every pun intended. As the Shapiro point out, in this piece, meditation is not about ‘thinking’ it’s about letting go of thinking, not ‘trying’ or ‘doing,’ but ‘being.’

Many “try” to meditate but their minds are so busy they get frustrated and quickly believe they are no good at it. Others turn into diehard advocates of a particular method or technique and become like a salesperson trying to sell a product.

One of the points addressed by the authors, which is often overlooked, in the rush to ‘learn’ to meditate, is that meditation is a natural process, one that just happens.

All the techniques, styles and types of meditation are simply methods help us quiet our “monkey minds.”  Whether you are drawn to TM, Primordial Sound, Vipassana or any other of the many meditation techniques, the best one is the one that works for you.

 

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Is meditation Safe?

Because there are so many benefits from meditating and because you’re almost never hear anything negative about meditation, does that mean that there are no possible negative consequences?

For the hard core, Newtonian oriented science types, the greatest consequence of meditating too much would be that you might feel a little spaced out.  But as the author, Stacey Nemour, points out others many have a different perception. According to Katie Weatherup, author of Practical Shamanism, “multiple hours a day of meditation can increase any tendency to dissociate, especially in trauma survivors because meditation is in itself an exercise of separating our minds from our physical reality!”ᅠ

There are countless benefits that come from meditation. Scientific studies show meditation activates the part of the brain that helps one make better decisions. Other benefits are anti-aging, healing, enhanced abilities and feeling balanced,

So is it simply a matter of a belief system that determines whether or not meditation poses any dangers? This question goes to the heart of the debate between materialist and spiritualist. Is there one central reality or do we each create our own?

What are your thoughts? What would happen if your shifted your perspective from the one you’re holding so close?

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Do you need a Guru to Benefit from Meditation?

The word guru conjures up all kinds of visions, mysterious mystics or silent mountain top monks, but the definition is generally accepted as teacher or classically as, “one who teaches spiritual liberation form his or her own direct experience of realization.”

Ram Dass and Maharaj-ji

Ram Dass and Maharaj-ji

The question is do you need one?  Actually, there are various reasons you may want a teacher. The most basic is, the reason you would want a teacher for anything, to help you avoid mistake and to speed up your learning time.

However, there are other questions that arise when deciding to look for a teacher. How do you choose the right kind of teacher? How do you find a teacher? What level of teacher are they, instructor, mentor, pandit or master?

What do you look for in a teacher, or as importantly, what to look out for in a teacher? These are all questions that will serve you well if you spend some time investigating them before you move forward, or to at least, keeping the questions in mind as you develop a relationship with a new teacher.ᅠ

They rely on him for calming meditation techniques – essential to counteract stress and muscle tightness during long weeks of intense training. He has now launched sessions open to individual clients, including rhythmic stretching, breathing exercises
Evening Standard

Ultimately, you will need to trust your own intuition, your inner guidance when choosing a teacher. Remember the old Vedic saying, “When the student is ready the teacher will come.” I will leave you with thoughts of Ram Dass on this subject, “Be open to all teachers and all teachings, and listen with your heart.

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